Ortega y Gasset and the topic of the visibility in Antonio Sannino's paintin

Ortega y Gasset and the topic of the visibility in Antonio Sannino's paintin

How many trees make up a forest? This is the question that the philosopher Ortega y Gasset tries to answer in such an outstanding book as the "Meditations on Quixote". A supposedly trivial question but it seems impossible to give a definite answer to it. After all the forest is a reality which flees from one's eyes, it is not composed of the trees which we see but rather of those which we do not see, the forest is actually always a little beyond where we are, the forest is just a possibility. And then, we know what a forest is composed of, and we know that we are in the middle of it when the trees before us hide more trees, when we realize that the visible landscape is covering other invisi-ble landscapes. Quoting Gasset: "The trees do not allow the forest to be seen, and it is due to this fact that the forest exists".

The topic developed by Gasset and which concerns Antonio Sannino's painting is the relationship between surface and depth, and more in general the topic of the visi-bility. By painting a few trees thickly placed within the boundary of the scene, Sannino catches the depth of the forest behind them, that is, he allows the depth (the forest) to hide itself behind the surface (the trees) and, paradoxically, to show itself through the surface, in a perfect material and spiritual harmony. Gasset also maintains: "For just as depth needs a surface beneath which to be concealed, the surface or outer cover, in order to be so, needs something over which to spread, covering it". And it is in this unsolvable hendyadys surface/depth that the miracle of visibility happens and it hap-pens, as suggested by the title of the picture, "Through the red", through the colour. It is not the shape of the birch trees, although packed in the space, to unveil – by hiding it – the essence of the forest, but rather it is the colour to suggest the depth of the surface; a colour applied almost in casual manner, which lets the aluminum support filter through, so extraordinarily deep in its bright surface.

Angelo Crespi

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Antonio Sannino

Antonio Sannino

Antonio Sannino (Naples, 1959), lives and works between Naples and Rome. Graduated in his city, he moved to England where he worked for 10 years experimenting with various painting techniques. Back to Italy, he continues his career with a series of personal exhibitions and participations in prestigious international competitions and fairs. His works are exhibited in galleries around the world and are loved by collectors and art lovers. Sannino with the recently perfected technique allows a pop-ish flatness: the use of an epoxy resin capable to vitrify the oil pastels laid on an aluminum medium which results into a thin and smooth surface which, paradoxically, enhances the depth of the composition. He creates a "landscape equivalent", a sort of no-landscape by which the artist does not want to represent reality any more, but he hints at it by getting its strongest expression.

More about Antonio Sannino

The red is a warmth color, very living, lively and agitated, it possesses an immense force, it is a movement in oneself Vassily Kandinsky

The red is a warmth color, very living, lively and agitated, it possesses an immense force, it is a movement in oneself Vassily Kandinsky

Through the red

Oil on aluminum and epoxy resin

Dimensions:
Width 150 cm - Height 150 cm
(59x59 inches)
Year: 2020

SOLD

Shining red

Oil on aluminum and epoxy resin

Dimensions:
Width 150 cm - Height 150 cm
(59x59 inches)
Year: 2020

SOLD

The hug

Oil and gold leaves on aluminum and epoxy resin

Dimensions:
Width 150 cm - Height 150 cm
(59x59 inches)
Year: 2020

SOLD

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